Decreased Serum Concentrations of 1,25(OH)2-Vitamin D3 in Patients with Gout

  • Sumio Takahashi
  • Tetsuya Yamamoto
  • Yuji Moriwaki
  • Zenta Tsutsumi
  • Jun-ichi Yamakita
  • Kazuya Higashino
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 431)

Summary

We measured the serum concentrations of l,25(OH)2-vitamin D3, 25(OH)-vitamin D3, parathyroid hormone (PTH) in 82 male patients with primary gout whose serum uric acid was significantly higher than that of 41 normal control male subjects (8.8 ± 0.2 vs 5.6 ± 0.2 mg/dL, p < 0.001). The serum l,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 concentration was significantly lower in the patients with gout compared with the control subjects (39.6 ± 1.4 vs 44.8 ± 1.7 pg/mL, p < 0.05), while no differences were observed between the two groups in either the serum concentration of 25(OH)-vitamin D3 or PTH. The administration of uric acid lowering agent to the patients for 1 year caused a significant increase in their serum 1,25(OH)2- vitamin D3 concentration which was associated with a significant decrease in their serum uric acid concentration. In contrast, the serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D3 and PTH were not affected by these drugs. These results suggest that uric acid per se may directly decrease the serum concentration of l,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 in patients with gout by inhibiting 1 -hydroxylase activity.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sumio Takahashi
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Yuji Moriwaki
    • 1
  • Zenta Tsutsumi
    • 1
  • Jun-ichi Yamakita
    • 1
  • Kazuya Higashino
    • 1
  1. 1.Third Department of Internal MedicineHyogo College of MedicineNishinomiyaJapan

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