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Fluorocarbons

  • Compressed Gas Association

Abstract

The term fluorocarbons is defined here as carbon compounds containing fluorine. If they contain only fluorine, they are sometimes referred to as FCs. The compounds may also contain chlorine, bromine, or hydrogen. Other descriptive names include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), fluorinated compounds, and halogenated hydrocarbons. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are compounds in this family that contains hydrogen. Unless otherwise specified, the term fluorocarbons in this monograph applies to FCs, CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs.

Keywords

Critical Temperature Boiling Point Freezing Point Critical Pressure Critical Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Compressed Gas Association
    • 1
  1. 1.ArlingtonUSA

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