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Growth Hormone pp 237-252 | Cite as

Effects of GH on Bone Metabolism and Bone Mass

  • Claes Ohlsson
Part of the Endocrine Updates book series (ENDO, volume 4)

Abstract

It is well known that growth hormone (GH) is important in the regulation of longitudinal bone growth (1; 2). Its role in the regulation of bone metabolism in man has not been understood until recently (1). Bone remodeling is regulated by a balance between bone resorption and bone formation. Recent studies, which demonstrate that GH exerts potent effects on bone remodeling, will be discussed in this chapter. Finally a hypothetical model for the mechanism of action of GH in the regulation of bone remodeling and bone mass will be presented.

Keywords

Bone Mineral Density Growth Hormone Bone Mass Growth Hormone Deficiency Growth Hormone Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claes Ohlsson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Research Centre for Endocrinology and MetabolismSahlgrenska University HospitalGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.Diabetes BranschNIDDK, NIHBethesdaUSA

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