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Emerging Markets in History:the United States,Japan,and Argentina

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Part of the Research Monographs in Japan-U.S. Business & Economics book series (JUSB,volume 4)

Abstract

What are “emerging markets”? And why are some more successful than others? As ours is an era in which barriers to international trade and capital flows are falling, and as a consequence more and more nations are “vemerging” as players in the world economy, these are important questions. This essay attempts to answer them as an economic historian might, that is, by studying and comparing several emerging markets of the past. The economic historian’s comparative method may not provide conclusive answers to the two questions, but it can offer suggestions worth pursuing and at least tentative answers.

Keywords

  • Central Bank
  • Banking System
  • Financial Development
  • Foreign Capital
  • Security Market

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1999 Springer Science+Business Media New York

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Sylla, R. (1999). Emerging Markets in History:the United States,Japan,and Argentina. In: Sato, R., Ramachandran, R.V., Mino, K. (eds) Global Competition and Integration. Research Monographs in Japan-U.S. Business & Economics, vol 4. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-5109-6_19

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-5109-6_19

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4613-7324-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4615-5109-6

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