Survey of Research Issues In LEO/MEO Based Global Mobile Communication Systems

  • Bezalel Gavish
Part of the Centre for Research on Transportation book series (CRT)

Abstract

On May 5, 1997 a Delta II rocket carried the first Iridium satellites into orbit, by mid-November 1997 thirty-nine satellites were in orbit. It is expected that during 1998, Iridium will become fully operational and available for public use. LEO (Low Earth Orbit) and MEO (Medium Earth Orbit) satellite based communication systems will provide, in the coming decade, widespread wireless communication services from any place to any place on Earth. Among their cited advantages is the fact that they transcend the boundaries imposed by local, state and regional governing bodies. LEO/MEO have the potential of providing instant communication services to regions lacking of telecommunication infrastructure. They support wireless communication from and to areas not covered by cellular or geostationary phone systems. They make it economically viable to provide mobile communication services to areas with low population density, or to areas with low demand for wireless communications. LEO/MEO based communication systems will offer and support a wide range of services including: voice based communications, paging services, one and two way messaging, data communications, video and multimedia services, broadcasting, positioning, monitoring and data collection, narrowband and wideband broadcasting and communication services.

Keywords

Burning Income Expense Resid Dial 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adams, W.S. and L. Rider. (1987). Circular Polar Constellations Providing Continuous Single or Multiple Coverage Above a Specified Latitude. The Journal of the Astronautical Sciences, 35(2):111–117.Google Scholar
  2. Arnon, S. and N.S. Kopeika. (1997a). Free Space Optical Communication Satellite Networks — Vibaration Effects and Possible Solutions. In Advancement of Photonics for Space, SPIE Conference, San Diego, CA.Google Scholar
  3. Arnon, S. and N.S. Kopeika. (1997b). The Performance Limitations of Free Space Optical Communication Satellite Networks due to Vibrations — Analog Case. Optical Engineering, 36(1):175–182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Ballard, A.H. (1980). Rosette Constellations of Earth Satellites. IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, 16(5):656–673.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Beste, D.C. (1978). Design of Satellite Constellations for Optimal Continuous Coverage. IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, 14(3):466–473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Gavish, B. (1995a). Low Earth Orbit Satellite Based Communication Systems — Some Research Issues. In Proceedings of EURO XIV, Jerusalem, pages 15–20.Google Scholar
  7. Gavish, B. (1995b). Telecommunications-A Revolution in Progress. Operations Research, 43(1):29–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gavish, B. (1997a). LEO/MEO Systems — Global Mobile Communication Systems. To appear in Telecommunication Systems.Google Scholar
  9. Gavish, B. (1997b). Low Earth Orbit Satellite Based Communication Systems — Research Opportunities. European Journal of Operational Research, 99:166–179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Gavish, B. and I Kalvenes. (1995). LEOS — Optimal Satellite Launch Policies: The Dynamic Case. To appear in Operations Research.Google Scholar
  11. Gavish, B. and J. Kalvenes. (1997a). The Impact of Intersatellite Communication Links on LEOS Performance. To appear in Telecommunication Systems.Google Scholar
  12. Gavish, B. and J. Kalvenes. (1997b). The Impact of Satellite Altitude on the Performance of LEOS Based Communication Systems. To appear in Wireless Networks.Google Scholar
  13. Gavish, B. and J. Kalvenes. (1997c). LEOS — Optimal Satellite Launch Policies: The Static Case. Management Science, 43(8):1164–1176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Kaniyil, J., J. Takei, S. Shimamoto, T. Usui, I. Oka and T. Kawabata. (1992). A Global Network Employing Low Earth-Orbiting Satellites. IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, 10(2):418–427.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Maral, G., J.J. de Ridder, B.G. Evans and M. Richharia. (1991). Low Earth Orbit Satellite Systems for Communications. International Journal of Satellite Communications, 9:209–225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Markowic, Z. and W. Hope. (1992). Small, Low Earth Orbit Communication Satellites — An Evaluation. In IREECON ′92. Australia’s Electronics Convention Proceedings, Vol. 1, pages 178–181 IREE, Edgecliff, NSW.Google Scholar
  17. Perrotta, G. (1991). A Comparison between Low Circular and Elliptical Inclined Orbits for Small Satellites Communication Applications. In Proceedings Second European Conference on Satellite Communications, Vol. ESA SP-322, ESA, Liège, Belgium, pages 431–434.Google Scholar
  18. Rider, L. (1985). Optimized Polar Orbit Constellations for Redundant Earth Coverage. The Journal of the Astronautical Sciences, 33(2):147–161.Google Scholar
  19. Rider, L. (1986). Analytic Design of Satellite Constellations for Zonal Coverage using Inclined Circular Orbits. The Journal of the Astronautical Sciences, 4(1):31–64.Google Scholar
  20. Sheriff, R.E. and J.G. Gardiner. (1993). The Applicability of LEO Satellites to 3rd Generation Networks. In Fourth IEE Conference on Telecommunications, IEE, London, pages 296–300. Conf. Publ. No. 371.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bezalel Gavish
    • 1
  1. 1.Vanderbilt UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations