Economics of Commercial Aircraft

  • Ivan L. Pitt
  • John R. Norsworthy
Part of the Transportation Research, Economics and Policy book series (TRES)

Abstract

Since the beginning of World War II the U.S. Air Force and Navy have been the largest customers for the U.S. aircraft industry. Government policies toward the commercial aircraft and air transportation industries have been partly responsible for their records of innovation and productivity growth through the policy impact on demand for aircraft both military and civilian, through regulation and through the direct support of research.1 The diffusion of scientific and manufacturing technology for airframes, jet engines and avionics, from military contractors to commercial manufacturers, the so-called dual use of technology or swing technology greatly benefited the U.S. commercial airline industry.

Keywords

Europe Transportation Income Assure Expense 

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Endnotes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ivan L. Pitt
    • 1
  • John R. Norsworthy
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Science and Technology PolicyRensselaer Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA
  2. 2.Lally School of Management and TechnologyRensselaer Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA

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