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Reliability in Measuring Market Orientation and Financial Performance in Transition Economies

  • Rohit Deshpandé
  • John U. Farley

Abstract

The successful transition of command economies to market economies clearly implies a need to develop effective marketing. As we have pointed out elsewhere (Deshpandé and Farley 1998a),
  • “Market Orientation is the central component of the more general notion of the Marketing Concept, the pillar upon which the modern study of marketing is based. Because of its significant managerial relevance, measuring Market Orientation has for the past five years been assigned top priority status in terms of research needs by the Marketing Science Institute.”

Keywords

Market Orientation Transitional Economy Command Economy Market Science Institute Market Concept 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rohit Deshpandé
    • 1
  • John U. Farley
    • 2
  1. 1.Harvard Business SchoolUSA
  2. 2.China-Europe International Business School and Amos Tuck SchoolChina

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