Food Science pp 464-477 | Cite as

Confectionery and Chocolate Products

  • Norman N. Potter
  • Joseph H. Hotchkiss
Part of the Food Science Text Series book series (FSTS)

Abstract

Confections (i.e., candy) can be divided into two broad categories: those in which sugar is the principal ingredient and those which are based on chocolate. Differences in sugar-based candies depend largely on manipulating the sugar to achieve special textural effects. This is accomplished primarily by controlling the state of crystallization of the sugar and the sugar-moisture ratio. Examples of sugar-type confections include nougats, fondants, caramels, taffees, and jellies. Examples of chocolate-based confections include chocolate-covered confections, chocolate-panned confections, chocolate bars, and chocolate-covered fruits, nuts, and cremes. Many ingredients, including milk products, egg white, food acids, gums, starches, fats, emulsifiers, flavors, nuts, fruits, and others are used in candy-making.

Keywords

Crystallization Sucrose Fermentation Starch Foam 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman N. Potter
  • Joseph H. Hotchkiss

There are no affiliations available

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