Food Science pp 279-315 | Cite as

Milk and Milk Products

  • Norman N. Potter
  • Joseph H. Hotchkiss
Part of the Food Science Text Series book series (FSTS)

Abstract

Milk and milk products cover a very wide range of raw materials and manufactured products. No attempt is made in this chapter to deal with all of them. Rather, the properties and processing of fluid milk and some of the more common products manufactured from it, such as specialty milks, ice cream, and cheese, are discussed. Butter and margarine are considered in Chapter 16 on fats and oils.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman N. Potter
  • Joseph H. Hotchkiss

There are no affiliations available

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