Electrical Characterization

  • Steven Frank
  • Wilson Tan
  • John F. West
Chapter
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 494)

Abstract

This chapter will present the concepts of electrical characterization for the failure analysis of IC’s. Electrical characterization plays a key role in the success of failure analysis. It provides the starting point for the complex process of narrowing the scope of analysis from an entire IC to a single bond wire, signal net, transistor or defective component. In some cases, particularly in single bit memory failures, electrical characterization can provide very detailed and precise information about the physical location of the failure. In other cases, a general area of the IC may be indicated. In all cases, electrical characterization provides the failing electrical conditions to perform physical failure site isolation described in later chapters. While most failure analysis tools and techniques bridge the full range of IC’s, significant differences exist in methodology and utilization of electrical characterization tools for different types of IC’s. In general, we can view the differences in the three broad categories of IC’s: logic, analog and memory. These distinctions may appear blurred as we approach “system on a chip” devices which contain all of these elements. Even when merged, however, there are elements of electrical characterization for these three types of circuits that carry through to the component blocks.

Keywords

Recombination Milling Assure 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Frank
    • 1
  • Wilson Tan
    • 2
  • John F. West
    • 3
  1. 1.Texas Instruments IncorporatedUSA
  2. 2.Micron Semiconductor Asia Pte LtdUSA
  3. 3.Cyrix CorporationUSA

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