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Information Processing and Energetic Factors in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

  • Joseph A. Sergeant
  • Jaap Oosterlaan
  • Jaap van der Meere

Abstract

Currently, children and adolescents with an excess of hyperactive, inattentive, and impulsive behavior are diagnosed as Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; see the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders {DSM-IV}, American Psychiatric Association, 1994, and chapter 1, this volume).

Keywords

ADHD Group ADHD Child Contingent Negative Variation Attention Deficit Disorder Hyperactive Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph A. Sergeant
    • 1
  • Jaap Oosterlaan
    • 1
  • Jaap van der Meere
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PsychologyUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Experimental Clinical PsychologyUniversity of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

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