Temperament and Behavioral Precursors to Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder

  • Ann Sanson
  • Margot Prior

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss the role played by early temperament and behavioral characteristics of the child in the development of Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBD), in the context of current models of developmental psychopathology. We begin with a discussion of definitional, conceptual, and theoretical issues before examining current literature. We attempt to review the most relevant literature; we also draw extensively on the data emerging from the Australian Temperament Project (ATP), in which almost 2000 children have been followed from infancy to (currently) 14 years of age. We then discuss evidence of gender-specific pathways from early temperament and behavior to Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Conduct Disorder (CD). Finally, the implications of findings for theoretical models of causative influences on DBD and for prevention and early intervention are explored.

Keywords

Depression Europe Attenuation Resis Posit 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Sanson
    • 1
  • Margot Prior
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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