The Toll of Bell

  • Alan A. Grometstein

Abstract

This book has shaped itself so that the EPR and the Bell experiments form its climax. The world of physics is still reacting to the ingenious proposal by Albert Einstein and his two colleagues (known collectively as EPR) that we can make measurements by proxy on the particle of interest. 1

Keywords

Cage Schizophrenia Coherence Triad Ghost 

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Endnotes

Endnotes

  1. 1.
    We used this telling phrase in Chapter 17.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Religious sects are divided on the question of whether their rituals are efficacious when performed by an unbeliever. Physics is tolerant in this regard, welcoming all, enthusiast and doubter alike.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    I say semiorthodox because a true believer in the CI simply postulates the collapse and shrugs away any resulting problems.Google Scholar
  4. 5.
    [d’Espagnat 1979:158].Google Scholar
  5. 6.
    [Clauser & 1978:1921].Google Scholar
  6. 8.
    [Stapp 1985:651]. By EPR-nonlocal, Stapp means (closely) what we would call nonlocal. Google Scholar
  7. 9.
    Any concept including instantaneous influences between separate events, or influences between events in disjoint lightcones, is bound to conflict with the tenets of special relativity. We shall allude to some of the resulting problems when we come to Bohm’s theory of motion.Google Scholar
  8. 10.
    The questions and Bell’s answer are from [Davies & 1986:Chap. 3].Google Scholar
  9. 12.
    In his Ph.D. thesis at Princeton, 1957. Everett’s mentor was John Wheeler.Google Scholar
  10. 16.
    [DeWitt 1970]. The article is reprinted in [DeWitt & 1973:155–165].Google Scholar
  11. 17.
    Remember that, in contemplating the S-equation applied to Schrödinger’s caged cat, we are dealing with a state space of at least 3 x 1026 dimensions. If we can accommodate that number, how can we boggle at the mere immensity of 101+? If physics does nothing else, it inures us to the use of large numbers.Google Scholar
  12. 19.
    qu [Woolf 1980].Google Scholar
  13. 20.
    [Davies & 1986]. This exceptionally interesting book, The Ghost in the Atom, consists of a series of interviews on the BBC of leading physicists by the editors, Davies and Brown. In the quotation in the text, John Bell is giving his opinion about alternatives to the CI.Google Scholar
  14. 21.
    [Bohm 1951].Google Scholar
  15. 22.
    The three selections are from Chapter 6 of Bohm’s book.Google Scholar
  16. 23.
    [Hiley & 1987:33]. Bohm’s attempt to bolster his faith in the CI by writing a book is reminiscent of the effort of John Henry Newman to bolster his faith in the Anglican Church by writing tracts in its support. As is well known, as a direct consequence of his effort, Newman became a Roman Catholic and, eventually, a Cardinal. Bohm’s fate was different.Google Scholar
  17. 24.
    [Bohm 1952]. The articles have the title “A suggested interpretation of quantum theory in terms of hidden variables.”Google Scholar
  18. 27.
    Most expositions of the TM designate the phase factor of NI by S. To avoid confusion with our use of S in “the S-equation,” we use 9 for the phase.Google Scholar
  19. 30.
    The figures come from a paper in a festschrift volume dedicated to David Bohm. It is a pleasant custom for colleagues of a prominent scientist to contribute papers to be presented in the form of a book on the occasion of his retirement or golden anniversary, etc. Such a festival writing (as the German phrase goes) was given to Bohm in 1988, four years before his death.Google Scholar
  20. 31.
    Since everything is real and determinate in the TM, you appreciate why the uncertainty principle poses a problem.Google Scholar
  21. 32.
    “On the impossible pilot wave”; in [Bell 1987:160].Google Scholar

Endnotes

  1. 1.
    The tripartite paper is in German, with the title “Die gegenwärtige Situation in der Quantenmechanik” We reference it as [Schrödinger 1935]. A full translation may be found in [Wheeler & 1983:152–67].Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    With apologies to Captain Corcoran.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    The phrasing of this translation is primarily based on [Fine 1986:65], as modified slightly by the translation in [Whitaker 1996:234]. I am responsible for any resulting inaccuracy or misphrasing in the blend.Google Scholar
  4. 5.
    Ailurophobes exist, but my readings of Schrödinger’s life do not suggest that he was one. He seems to have been indifferent to cats, a rare state of mind. You may recall that Mark Twain’s daughter was once asked about her parents’ domestic life; she replied that they got along famously, except that “Mommy loved morals, while Daddy loved cats.”Google Scholar
  5. 6.
    In Iolanthe, Strephon is of mixed parentage: his mother is a fairy and his father merely a mortal (the Lord Chancellor, in fact). Strephon is immortal above the waist but all too mortal below, and you can imagine his sad plight. Nevertheless, he is real, not latent like our gedanken cat.Google Scholar
  6. 10.
    We must not be overly parochial. Remember Voltaire’s aphorism: “Only a mole could have created all this glory,” said the mole. “Nonsense: only a June bug!” said the June bug.Google Scholar
  7. 11.
    [Bell 1990:33]; qu [Baggott 1992:178–179].Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan A. Grometstein

There are no affiliations available

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