Advertisement

Phenotypic Expression of an Oxytocin Peptide Null Mutation in Mice

  • James T. Winslow
  • Larry J. Young
  • Elizabeth Hearn
  • Brenden Gingrich
  • Zouxin Wang
  • Qiuxia Guo
  • Martin M. Matzuk
  • Thomas R. Insel
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 449)

Abstract

OT has been implicated in several aspects of reproduction including sexual behavior, induction of labor, milk ejection and maternal behavior (Carter, 1992; Witt, 1995). Pharmacological and biochemical studies have also implicated OT in the modulation of separation distress, social preference and aggressive behavior. To further examine the role of endogenous OT in the development and expression of reproductive and other social behavior, a transgenic mouse was engineered to produce deletion of the DNA sequence encoding the OT peptide (Nishimori et al., 1996). In particular, embryonic stem cells were electroporated with the deletion-targeting DNA sequence. Homologous recombination of the targeting sequence with the OT gene resulted in a recombinant allele lacking the DNA sequences coding for the OT peptide, which are located on the first exon. Cell lines with the correct recombination event were injected into blastocysts in order to create chimeras. Chimeras with germ-line transmission were used to create the strain of OT “knockout” mice.

Keywords

Maternal Behavior Social Memory Prairie Vole Milk Ejection Male Intruder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Carter, C. S. (1992). Oxytocin and sexual behavior. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 16(2), 131–144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Dantzer, R., Bluthe, R. M., Koob, G. F., & Le Moal, M. (1987). Modulation of social memory in male rats by neurohypophyseal peptides. Psychopharmacology, 91(3), 363–368.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ferris, C. F., Foote, K. B., Meltser, H. M., Plenby, M. G., Smith, K. L., & Insel, T. R. (1992). Oxytocin in the amygdala facilitates maternal aggression. Ann N YAcad Sci, 652, 456–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Insel, T. R., & Winslow, J. T. (1991). Central administration of oxytocin modulates the infant rat’s response to social isolation. EurJ Pharmacol, 203(l), 149–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Nishimori, K., Young, L. J., Guo, Q., Wang, Z., Insel, T. R., & Matzuk, M. M. (1996). Oxytocin is required for nursing but is not essential for parturition or reproductive behavior. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 93(21), 11699–11704.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Popik, P., Vetulani, J., & Van Ree, J. M. (1993). Social memory and neurohypophyseal hormones. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 3(3), 200–201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Winslow, J. T., & Camacho, F. (1995). Cholinergie modulation of a decrement in social investigation following repeated contacts between mice. Psychopharmacology (Berl), 121(2), 164–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Winslow, J. T., Hastings, N., Carter, C. S., Harbaugh, C. R., & Insel, T. R. (1993). A role for central vasopressin in pair bonding in monogamous prairie voles. Nature, 365(6446), 545–548.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Winslow, J. T., & Insel, T. R. (1991a). Infant rat separation is a sensitive test for novel anxiolytics. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiaty, 15(6), 745–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Winslow, J. T., & Insel, T. R. (1991b). The infant rat separation paradigm: a novel test for novel anxiolytics. Trends Pharmacol Sci, 12(11), 402–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Winslow, J. T., Shapiro, L., Carter, C. S., & Insel, T. R. (1993). Oxytocin and complex social behavior: Species comparisons. Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 29(3), 409–414.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Witt, D. M. (1995). Oxytocin and rodent sociosexual responses: From behavior to gene expression. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 19(2), 315–324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • James T. Winslow
    • 1
  • Larry J. Young
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Hearn
    • 1
  • Brenden Gingrich
    • 1
  • Zouxin Wang
    • 1
  • Qiuxia Guo
    • 2
  • Martin M. Matzuk
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Thomas R. Insel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Yerkes Regional Primate CenterEmory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Molecular and Human GeneticsBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Cell BiologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations