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Nerve Conduction Velocity and Mobile Phones

  • Vitas Anderson
  • Leigh Davidson
  • Ken H. Joyner
  • Andrew W. Wood
  • Richard Macdonell
  • Josie Curatolo

Abstract

In Australia there have been a small number of reports associating the use of analog (AMPS) and digital (GSM) mobile phone handsets with various neurological complaints1. The symptomatic data collected so far has been subjective and quite diverse ranging from various forms of headaches to descriptions of unpleasant tingling and burning sensations on the skin. This makes it difficult to define this phenomenon as a discrete syndrome and assign a probable aetiology. Possible causes suggested so far include: ultra-sonic noise from the earpiece, chemical outgassing from warm handsets and psychosomatic association.

Keywords

Mobile Phone Cluster Headache Ulnar Nerve Nerve Conduction Velocity Facial Nerve Latency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vitas Anderson
    • 1
  • Leigh Davidson
    • 1
  • Ken H. Joyner
    • 1
  • Andrew W. Wood
    • 2
  • Richard Macdonell
    • 3
  • Josie Curatolo
    • 3
  1. 1.Telstra Research LaboratoriesClaytonAustralia
  2. 2.Swinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia
  3. 3.Austin HospitalHeidelbergAustralia

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