Rape

  • William L. Marshall
  • Yolanda M. Fernandez
  • Franca Cortoni
Part of the The Plenum Series in Crime and Justice book series (PSIC)

Abstract

Definitions of rape vary considerably depending on who is doing the defining and on the context in which the definition is provided. Legal definitions have, until recent years, specified rape as the penile penetration by a male of an unwilling female’s vagina. This, of course, excluded male victims, identified rape as a strictly sexual act, and required some demonstration that the victim’s vagina had indeed been penetrated specifically by the male’s penis. These requirements had the unfortunate consequence of making the victim’s prior sexual history seem relevant to the proper adjudication of a charge of rape, and this emphasis tended to obscure the nonsexual components of rape and, most importantly, the assaultive aspects of the crime.

Keywords

Depression Schizophrenia Serotonin Serin Resi 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • William L. Marshall
    • 1
  • Yolanda M. Fernandez
    • 1
  • Franca Cortoni
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada

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