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Characterization of Rhizobia Associated with Dalea Spp. in Natural Prairies and Revegetation Areas in Minnesota

  • P. H. Graham
  • K. G. Ballen
  • C. Montealegre
  • R. K. Jones
  • B. Fischer
  • E. Luque

Abstract

The purple prairie clover (Dalea purpurea) is increasingly used in revegetation projects in Minnesota, but little is known of inoculation requirements, nor of the rhizobia themselves. In this paper we report characterization of Dalea rhizobia from native prairies and revegetation sites in Minnesota.

Analysis of 57 isolates from Dalea, Coronilla, and Onobrychis identified seven major groupings. Dalea purpurea strains isolated from revegetation sites clustered into 3 groups, separate from inoculant stains for this species. Prairie isolates also divided into three clusters, though 10 strains only clustersd with other Dalea rhizobia at close to 80% similarity. The Dalea rhizobia appeared unrelated to the reference strains used, though FAME, serological, and infebtive overlap with R. etli was noted.

Rhizobial genomic DNA from 19 strains of Dalea rhizobia, amplified using Box primer, gave rise to 76 bands on agarose gel electrophoresis. Groupings based on PCR were similar to those obtained from phenotypic analysis.

Pronounced host-Rhizhobium interaction affected nodulation and N2 fixation among species of Dalea, and with Coronilla, Onobrychis and Phaseolus

Keywords

Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Rhizobium Species Native Prairie Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Analysis Yeast Extract Mannitol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. H. Graham
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. G. Ballen
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Montealegre
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. K. Jones
    • 1
    • 3
  • B. Fischer
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. Luque
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Journal series No 98–1250058 of the University of Minnesota Agricultural Experiment stationSt PaulUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of Soil, Water, and ClimateUniversity of MinnesotaSt PaulUSA
  3. 3.Dept. of Plant PathologyUniversity of MinnesotaSt PaulUSA
  4. 4.University of NarinoPastoColombia

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