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The Importance of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

  • Ralph J. DiClemente
  • James M. Raczynski
Part of the The Springer Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology and Medicine book series (SSBP)

Abstract

Understanding human behavior is a daunting challenge. The noted mathematician Sir Isaac Newton once remarked that he could predict the motion of heavenly bodies but not the behavior of people. So, too, do we, who are dedicated to understanding human behavior, specifically as it affects the health of human populations, acknowledge the complexities inherent in our enterprise. Equally, if not more challenging, are our efforts to modify human behavior.

Keywords

Health Promotion Risk Behavior Disease Prevention Unintentional Injury Chronic Disease Prevention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph J. DiClemente
    • 1
  • James M. Raczynski
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public HealthEmory University, and Emory/Altanta Center for AIDS ResearchAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Behavioral Medicine Unit, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Department of Health Behavior, School of Public Health, UAB Center for Health PromotionUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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