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Commitment and Trust in Close Relationships

An Interdependence Analysis
  • Caryl E. Rusbult
  • Jennifer Wieselquist
  • Craig A. Foster
  • Betty S. Witcher
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Sometimes everyday involvement with a close partner is relatively easy. When partners’ goals are compatible and their circumstances of interdependence are congenial, couples can readily achieve desirable outcomes such as intimacy, companionship, and security. The true test of a relationship arises when existing circumstances are not so congenial—when partners confront problematic constraints or dilemmas centering on differing activity preferences, hostile patterns of interaction, extrarelationship temptation, or incompatible life goals. In such situations, the immediate interests of one or both individuals may well be incompatible with the interests of the partner or relationship. Behavior in such uncongenial situations is revealing of individuals’ dispositions, values, and goals.

Keywords

Strong Commitment Investment Model Ongoing Relationship Maintenance Mechanism Couple Functioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caryl E. Rusbult
    • 1
  • Jennifer Wieselquist
    • 1
  • Craig A. Foster
    • 1
  • Betty S. Witcher
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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