Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

  • Amy L. Krain
  • Philip C. Kendall
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

The cognitive-behavioral approach to the treatment of children and adolescents integrates cognitive restructuring and problem solving with behavioral techniques such as contingency management and modeling (Kendall, 1991). The primary aim of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is to modify or improve a child’s maladaptive emotional, cognitive, and behavioral responses to his environment. It is fairly structured, and often time-limited. As part of the treatment, the therapist helps the client to better understand the mechanisms by which thoughts and feelings influence and mediate behavior. This perspective is not explained to the clients—they are children—but becomes evident through shared experiences and exposure tasks. The theory is problem-solving oriented, focusing on cognitive information processing, as well as social skills and interactions. Learning to generate alternatives and evaluate outcomes are essential tools for adaptive functioning across the life span. Through use of performance-based procedures, new skills are refined and reinforced by feedback and encouragement. Contingencies help to encourage involvement and stimulate motivation.

Keywords

Placebo Depression Dition Tricyclic Methylphenidate 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amy L. Krain
    • 1
  • Philip C. Kendall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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