Update on Influenza and Rhinovirus Infections

  • Frederick G. Hayden
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 458)

Abstract

Since the 4th Triennial Conference at Antiviral Chemotherapy held in November 1994, no new antiviral drugs or vaccines have been approved for use in influenza or rhi-novirus infections in the United States. The only newly approved therapy for symptomatic management of upper respiratory illnesses is topical ipratropium. Intranasal administration of this quaternary anticholinergic reduces colds-associated rhinorrhea to a moderate extent.1 However, considerable clinical investigation has led to important advances in regard to prevention and treatment of influenza virus infections and provided new insights in regard to possible measures for management of rhinovirus infections. This paper will update previous reviews from this conference2,3,4,5 and summarize recent developments with agents that are in active clinical development.

Keywords

Placebo Interferon Glutamine Lactose Acetaminophen 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick G. Hayden
    • 1
  1. 1.Health Sciences CenterUniversity of Virginia School of MedicineCharlottesvilleUSA

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