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Water Immobilization in Low-Fat Meat Batters

  • Phyllis J. Shand

Abstract

Water immobilization/entrapment in low-fat meat batters is a complex phenomenon which is not fully understood. Changes in both pore and particle size and matrix homogeneity can influence water-holding and textural properties of meat batters or gels. The importance of viscosity, polymer size and shape and partitioning of water by particles to entrapment of water in low-fat meat batters is illustrated. Microstructure properties such as pore size distribution may impact perception of juiciness but this has not been systematically studied. There is a need for standardization of water-holding capacity methodology and development of novel techniques to further explore mechanisms of water-holding in low-fat meat batters

Keywords

Meat Product Cooking Loss Water Immobilization Meat Batter Cooking Yield 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phyllis J. Shand
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Microbiology and Food ScienceUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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