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Monoclonal Antibodies against Heat-Treated Muscle Proteins for Species Identification and End-Point Temperature Determination of Cooked Meats

  • Y-H. P. Hsieh
  • F. C. Chen
  • N. Djurdjevic

Abstract

Quality and safety of muscle foods have been a concern of consumers and regulatory authorities. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been recognized as a sensitive and suitable analytical method in muscle foods for quality control and enforcement of food safety and labeling regulations. Several monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) have been developed as probing agents in ELISA for quantitative identification of adulterated meat species in fully cooked products. The Mabs developed were raised against heat-treated muscle proteins. The extent of heat treatment of a particular meat species could also be determined by these Mabs by comparing the increased ELISA response with the increase end-point cooking temperature. Therefore, these Mabs could be used to determine the maximum internal cooking temperature of a precooked meat sample to ensure safety of products. A brief review of current techniques and the experimental approach, characterization, and applications of these Mabs are addressed in this chapter

Keywords

Muscle Protein Indirect ELISA Competitive ELISA Chicken Breast Cooking Temperature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y-H. P. Hsieh
    • 1
  • F. C. Chen
    • 1
  • N. Djurdjevic
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nutrition and Food ScienceAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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