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Hypoxia pp 355-358 | Cite as

A Tribute to Niels Lassen

December 7th, 1926—April 30th, 1997
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Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 474)

Abstract

Niels Lassen died in Copenhagen of pancreatic carcinoma at 71. He was the premier leader in the field of quantitation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Immediately after finishing medical school, he and Ole Munck introduced the use of radioactive isotopes for CBF measurement. With David Ingvar, he was the first to use collimated radioactive extracranial counting after intracarotid injection of the radioactive isotope 85Krypton or 133Xenon dissolved in saline to localize regions of high or low cerebral flow. His mathematician wife Edda Sveinsdotter developed programming methods and much technical support. Functional brain mapping was pioneered by Lassen using, finally, a 254 detector system. With Bo Siesjo and David Ingvar, he founded the International Cerebral Blood Flow meetings and later the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. From 1962 to 1996 he was chairman of the department of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine at Bispebjerg Hospital in Copenhagen. Niels’ command of English was better than mine, elegant, witty and creative. The terms “luxury perfusion” and “ischemic penumbra” are his.

Key words

cerebral blood flow 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AnesthesiologyUniversity of California San FranciscoUSA

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