Advertisement

Radical Scavenging Properties of Tryptophan Metabolites

Estimation of their Radical Reactivity
  • K. Goda
  • Y. Hamane
  • R. Kishimoto
  • Y. Ogishi
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 467)

Abstract

Radical scavenging properties of tryptophan metabolites were estimated using their radical reactivity. Metabolites of the kynurenine and the melatonin biosynthesis pathway were mainly examined by use of a kinetical model. Their radical reactivity was determined as the reaction rate constant with a stable free radical, such as galvinoxyl; that is a phenoxy radical. The rate constants of the metabolites have a widely ranged spectrum, which can be divided into three groups. The first group (3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, and indole-3-pyruvic acid) is more reactive than α-tocopherol; the reactivity of the second group (xanthurenic acid, serotonin, N-acetylserotonin) is similar to that of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT); the third group (kynurenic acid, melatonin, and other ones) is less reactive than BHT.

Keywords

Electron Spin Resonance Radical Reactivity Methyl Linoleate Butylate Hydroxy Toluene Quinolinic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allen, K., Hung, C., and Marin, C., 1990, Determination of picomole quantities of hydroperoxides by a coupled glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase and glutathione disulfide specific glutathione reductase assay. Anal. Biochem. 186:108–111.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bartlett, P.D. and Funahashi, T., 1962, Galvinoxyl (2,6-Di-tert-butyl-α-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadiene-l-ylidene)-p-tolyoxy as a scavenger of shorter-lived free radicals, J. Am. Client. Soc. 84:2596–2601.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Coppinger, G.M., 1957, A stable phenoxy radical inert to oxygen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 79:501–502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Evans, C., Scaiano, J.C., and Ingold, K.U., Absolute kinetics of hydrogen abstraction from α-tocopherol by several reactive species including an alkyl radical, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114:4589-4593.Google Scholar
  5. Goda, K., Kishimoto, R., Shimizu, S., Hamane, Y., and Ueda, M., 1996, Quinolinic acid and active oxygens; possible contribution of active oxygens during cell death in the brain, Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 398:247–254.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hardeland, R., Berhrmann, G., Fuhrberg, B., Burkhardt, S., Uria, H., and Obst, B., 1996, Evolutionary aspects of indoleamines as radical scavengers, Adv. Exp. Med, Bi l. 398:279–284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Melchiorri, D., Reiter, R.J., Attia, A.M., Hara, M., Burgos, A., and Nistico, G., 1995a, Potent protective effect of melatonin on in vivo paraquat-induced oxidative damage in rats, Life Sci. 96:83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Paul, H., Small, Jr, R.D., and Scaiano, J.C., 1978, Hydrogen abstraction by tert-butoxy radicals. A laser photolysis and electron spin resonance study, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 100:4520–4527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Reiter, R.J., 1998, Oxidative damage in the central nervous system: Protection by melatonin, Progress in Neurobiol. 56:359–384.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Goda
    • 1
  • Y. Hamane
    • 1
  • R. Kishimoto
    • 1
  • Y. Ogishi
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of NutritionKobe Gakuin UniversityKobeJapan

Personalised recommendations