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Part of the book series: Recent Advances in Phytochemistry ((RAPT,volume 33))

Abstract

The earliest of Man’s uses of plant materials rich in polyphenolic metabolites was in the conversion of animal hides to leather, and archaeological records relate to this operation in Mediterranean regions around 1500 BC. Whilst a complete scientific understanding of the traditional tanner’s art remains, at best, incomplete,1 different light has been thrown on facets of this question from other sources. Thus, polyphenol interactions with proteins (and other biological molecules and macromolecules) underlie a wide range of other apparently unrelated properties of plant materials. These include: astringency; ecology and chemical defense in plants; foodstuffs, nutrition and beverages; fruit and floral pigmentation; natural glues, varnishes, and exoskeletons; and the influence of diet and the application of herbal medicines in the treatment of certain pathological conditions.2

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Haslam, E., Williamson, M.P., Baxter, N.J., Charlton, A.J. (1999). Astringency and Polyphenol Protein Interactions. In: Romeo, J.T. (eds) Phytochemicals in Human Health Protection, Nutrition, and Plant Defense. Recent Advances in Phytochemistry, vol 33. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-4689-4_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-4689-4_11

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