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Transcriptional Regulation of the Pou Gene Oct-6 in Schwann Cells

  • Wim Mandemakers
  • Ronald Zwart
  • Robert Kraay
  • Gerard Grosveld
  • Anneke Graus Martine Jaegle
  • Ludo Broos
  • Dies Meijer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 468)

Abstract

Genetic evidence suggests that the POU transcription factor Oct-6 plays a pivotal role as an intracellular regulator of Schwann cell differentiation. In the absence of Oct-6 function Schwann cells are generated in appropriate numbers and these cells differentiate normally up to the promyelin stage at which they transiently arrest. During peripheral nerve development Oct-6 expression is initiated in Schwann cell precursors and is strongly upregulated in promyelin cells. Oct-6 expression is subsequently extinguished in terminally differentiating Schwann cells. Thus, identification and characterisation of the DNA elements involved in this stage specific regulation may lead us to the signaling cascade and the axon-derived signals that drive Schwann cell differentiation and initiate myelination. Here we present experiments that aim at identifying such regulatory sequences.

Keywords

Schwann Cell Schwann Cell Differentiation Schwann Cell Lineage DNAseI Hypersensitive Site Schwann Cell Precursor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wim Mandemakers
    • 1
  • Ronald Zwart
    • 1
  • Robert Kraay
    • 1
  • Gerard Grosveld
    • 1
  • Anneke Graus Martine Jaegle
    • 1
  • Ludo Broos
    • 1
  • Dies Meijer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cell Biology and GeneticsErasmus UniversityRotterdamNetherlands

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