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The Effect of Humic Substances from Oxyhumolite on Plant Development

  • Slawomir S. Gonet
  • Elzbieta Gonet
  • Andrzej Dziamski

Abstract

The results of many investigations have shown that soil organic matter (OM) significantly affects the growth and yield of plants. This effect can be indirect because OM in general influences soil fertility by determining soil physical and chemical properties (air and water conditions, sorption properties and structure) or direct - connected with the uptake of many other processes, for example, protein and nucleic acids synthesis, enzymatic activity, photosynthesis and respiration (Chen and Aviad 1990, Vaughan and Malcolm 1985). Mechanisms of direct interaction between humic substances and plants are not fully explained yet. Many other problems require profound studies. They are, among others, explanation in which phases of plant development humic substances are important and the description of connections between the structure and chemical properties of humic substances and their effectiveness.

Keywords

Soil Organic Matter Humic Substance Humic Acid Brown Coal Barley Grain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Slawomir S. Gonet
    • 1
  • Elzbieta Gonet
    • 2
  • Andrzej Dziamski
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Soil ChemistryUniversity of Technology and AgricultureBydgoszczPoland
  2. 2.Department of Botany and EcologyUniversity of Technology and AgricultureBydgoszczPoland

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