Energy Modelling for Economies in Transition

  • Monique Voogt
  • Frits van Oostvoorn
  • Marko L. van Leeuwen
  • Jan Willem Velthuijsen
Part of the ZEI Studies in European Economics and Law book series (ZEIS, volume 3)

Abstract

The transition of Central and Eastern European (CEE) economies from a “centrally planned administrative controlled economy” to a “market-oriented economy” involves a complex process of political, institutional, socio-economic and behavioural changes. This paper addresses the issue of modelling the economy and energy sector changes and their interactions in a way that supports the energy policy maker to guide this process in a ‘desired’ direction and avoiding costly errors in implementing ‘wrong’ policies and strategies that would contradict its objectives. Clearly the transition process of the East European countries is one of the most challenging events of our times for policy makers and thereby also for energy model builders to analyse in support of their decisions.

Keywords

Combustion Europe Income Expense OECD 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Baken, J. et al. (1997) Integrated Energy Scenarios to 2020 for Preparing Energy Policy Guidelines for Poland, Volume I: Methodology Scenario Analyses and Recommendations, ECN-CX-97-092, ECN, Petten.Google Scholar
  2. Bergman, L. (1990) “Energy and Environmental Constraints: a CGE Modelling Approach”, Journal of Policy Modelling,12(3).Google Scholar
  3. Bergman, L., Jorgenson Dale W. and Zalai Erno (1991) General Equilibrium Modelling and Economic Policy Analysis.Google Scholar
  4. Böhringer, C., “The Synthesis of Bottom-Up and Top-Down in Energy Policy Modeling”, Energy Economics, 20(3), 233–248.Google Scholar
  5. Burniaux, J.-M., J.P Martin, G. Nicoletti and J.O Martins (1992) “GREEN, A Multi-Sector, Multi-Region General Equilibrium Model for Quantifying the Costs of Curbing CO2 Emissions: a Technical Manual”, OECD working papers no.l16, Paris.Google Scholar
  6. Conrad, K., P. Capros and T. Georgakopouios (1997) “The Gem-E3 General Equilibrium Model for the European Union”, Economic & Financial Modelling, Vol. 4, No. 2 & 3, 51–159.Google Scholar
  7. Deaton, A. and J. Muellbauer (1989) Economics and Consumer Behaviour, Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  8. De Kruijk, H. (1994) The EU Energy and Environmental Model Specified in GAMS, Model Description and User’s Guide, ECN-C-94-021, Petten.Google Scholar
  9. European Commission (1996) “European Energy to 2020. A Scenario Approach”, Energy in Europe, special issue Spring 1996, Directorate General for Energy (DG XVII), Luxemburg.Google Scholar
  10. Hille, E, et al. (1993) Task Force on Integrated Energy and Environmental Planning, Volume II: Integrated Economy-Energy — Environment Policy in Poland; A Computable General Equilibrium Approach, The Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten.Google Scholar
  11. Laroui, F. (1995) “A Brief History of Modelling”, in Laroui, F. and M.J. van Leeuwen Top-Down or Bottom-Up Modelling?: an Application to CO 2 Abatement, SEO-report 356.Google Scholar
  12. Leeuwen, M.J., F. Laroui and H. Visee (1995) “An Economy Energy Environment Computable General Equilibrium Model for the Netherlands”, in Laroui, F. and M.J. van Leeuwen Top-Down or Bottom-Up Modelling?: an Application to CO 2 Abatement, SEO-report 356.Google Scholar
  13. Leeuwen, M.J. van (ed.) (1997) Energy, Environment and the Economy in a CGE Model Concept: Final Report, SEO-rapport nr. 419, Phare ACE Programme: project no. P95-2049-R, SEO, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  14. Manne, A.S. and C.O. Wene (1992) MARKAL-MACRO: a Linked Model for Energy-Economic Analysis, BNL-47161, New York.Google Scholar
  15. Shoven, J.B. and J. Whalley (1992) Applied General Equilibrium, Cambridge Surveys of Economic Literature.Google Scholar
  16. Shoven, J.B. and J. Whalley (1984) “Applying General-Equilibrium Models of Taxation and International Trade: An Introduction and Survey”, Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. XXII.Google Scholar
  17. Voogt, M. et al. (1998) Development of Energy Scenarios and a CGE/EFOM-ENV Model System for Romania, Volume I: Methodology Scenario Analysis and Recommendations, ECN-CX-98-005, ECN, Petten.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monique Voogt
    • 1
  • Frits van Oostvoorn
    • 1
  • Marko L. van Leeuwen
    • 1
  • Jan Willem Velthuijsen
    • 1
  1. 1.ECN, Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Department for Policy Studies; SEO, Foundation for Economic ResearchUniversity of AmsterdamThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations