Development of a New Resin System for the U.S. ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil

  • R. P. Reed
  • D. Evans
  • P. E. Fabian
Chapter

Abstract

Vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) is the final major step in fabrication of the U.S. Central Solenoid Model Coil for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program. The model coil construction uses insulation materials and processing techniques that simulate those for future full-scale central solenoids of tokamak fusion reactors. For resin impregnation, a new epoxy system was developed and used. This paper describes the new resin system and presents its processing properties. The resin system has improved radiation resistance, longer working life, and lower viscosity than resins that are currently being used for VPI of superconducting coils.

Keywords

Fatigue Porosity Silane Epoxy Shrinkage 

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. Reed
    • 1
  • D. Evans
    • 2
  • P. E. Fabian
    • 3
  1. 1.Cryogenic Materials, Inc.BoulderUSA
  2. 2.Rutherford LaboratoriesChilton, DidcotUK
  3. 3.Composite Technology Development, Inc.BoulderUSA

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