The Use of Y-Chromosomal DNA Variation to Investigate Population History

Recent Male Spread in Asia and Europe
  • Tatiana Zerjal
  • Arpita Pandya
  • Fabrício R. Santos
  • Raju Adhikari
  • Eduardo Tarazona
  • Manfred Kayser
  • Oleg Evgrafov
  • Lalji Singh
  • Kumarasamy Thangaraj
  • Giovanni Destro-Bisol
  • Mark G. Thomas
  • Raheel Qamar
  • S. Qasim Mehdi
  • Zoë H. Rosser
  • Matthew E. Hurles
  • Mark A. Jobling
  • Chris Tyler-Smith

Abstract

Y-chromosomal DNA lineages can be used to trace the origins of males in modern populations. A combination of biallelic markers has been used to identify “haplogroup 3” Y chromosomes, which are widespread and common in many European and Asian populations. Microsatellite analysis shows that the diversity of haplogroup 3 chromosomes is low, suggesting a recent spread.

Keywords

Europe Recombination Agarose Bromide Electrophoresis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tatiana Zerjal
    • 1
  • Arpita Pandya
    • 1
  • Fabrício R. Santos
    • 1
  • Raju Adhikari
    • 1
  • Eduardo Tarazona
    • 1
  • Manfred Kayser
    • 2
  • Oleg Evgrafov
    • 3
  • Lalji Singh
    • 4
  • Kumarasamy Thangaraj
    • 4
  • Giovanni Destro-Bisol
    • 5
  • Mark G. Thomas
    • 6
  • Raheel Qamar
    • 7
  • S. Qasim Mehdi
    • 7
  • Zoë H. Rosser
    • 8
  • Matthew E. Hurles
    • 8
  • Mark A. Jobling
    • 8
  • Chris Tyler-Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.CRC Chromosome Molecular Biology Group, Department of BiochemistryUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  2. 2.Department of Evolutionary GeneticsMax Planck Institute for Evolutionary AnthropologyLeipzigGermany
  3. 3.Research Centre for Medical GeneticsRussian Academy of Medical SciencesMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Centre for Cellular and Molecular BiologyHyderabadIndia
  5. 5.Dipartimento di Biologia Animale e dell’UomoUniversita “La Sapienza”RomaItaly
  6. 6.Center for Genetic Anthropology, The Departments of Anthropology and Biology, Darwin BuildingUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  7. 7.Biomedical & Genetic Engineering LaboratoriesIslamabadPakistan
  8. 8.Department of GeneticsUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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