Critical Systems Thinking and the Development of Information Technology in Organisations: Another Perspective

  • Diego Ricardo Torres Martinez

Abstract

Most of the literature1 and the practice of the development of IT in organisations seem to be focused upon the technical part [Davies et al, 1989: 61]. It focuses attention on the technological devices in isolation; where computer science plays an important role. It is concerned with the technical hardware development and software engineering, rather than with the relationships between IT and for example, individuals and the organisation itself. Also it is clear that an historical overview of the evolution of IT in organisations allows us to have a better understanding of the present role of IT in organisations. The significance that the computer itself is a radical invention2 makes clear the social construction of IT. Furthermore, it is clear that IT is a strategic resource and there exists an important concern about how IT can fit into and support organisations. The history of IT displayed the relationship between the enabling effects

Keywords

Income Hull Logical Positivism Stein Kelly 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diego Ricardo Torres Martinez
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Systems EngineeringPontificia Universidad JaverianaCOLOMBIA

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