Integrated Concepts for the Protection of Cultural Artifacts Against Biodeterioration

  • Thomas Warscheid

Abstract

The importance of microbial impacts in the alteration and deterioration of cultural artefacts made of mineral, metallic or organic materials has been widely acknowledged in the course of many recent investigations. While in the past biodeterioration problems on cultural artefacts were often handled without a detailed analysis and, as a consequence, simply controlled by biocidal treatments, a much deeper interdisciplinary understanding of the environmental factors and material properties regulating the biogenic damage factor would allow more specific and adequate interventions. The upcoming possibilities and potential realisation of integrated concepts in the protection of cultural artefacts against biodeterioration will be basically explained with the analytical and evaluating approach and will be exemplified by the presentation of case studies dealing with the conservation of historical objects made of natural stones, wall-paintings, historical glass, archives (e.g. paper, leather, parchment) and organic coatings.

Key words

biodeterioration interdisciplinarity protection cultural artefacts 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Warscheid
    • 1
  1. 1.IWT- Institute for Material Science - MicrobiologyBremenGermany

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