The Projective Perception of the Social World

A Building Block of Social Comparison Processes
  • Joachim Krueger
Part of the The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Festinger (1954) proposed that people seek accurate knowledge of the self, and that to find it, they compare themselves with similar others. He peppered his paper with references to the idea that people have some notion as to who is similar to them and who is not. His followers agree: “Looking for or identifying a similarity or a difference between the other and the self on some dimension [is a] core feature [of the theory]; the majority of comparison researchers implicitly seem to share this definition” (Wood, 1997, p. 521). But how do perceptions of similarity and dissimilarity arise?

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joachim Krueger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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