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Neuropsychology Training

Ethnocultural Considerations in the Context of General Competency Training
  • Wilfred G. van Gorp
  • Hector F. Myers
  • Evan B. Drake
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Education and training in clinical neuropsychology have experienced a rapid development and crystallization over the past decade and a half, paralleling the explosive growth of the specialty. However, while there has been substantial growth in the specification of training requirements and competency guidelines in the specialty of clinical neuropsychology, meaningful integration of ethnocultural issues into the training curricula must be accomplished. In this chapter, we review the historical developments in generic training of neuropsychologists, then discuss the range of issues that the specialty of neuropsychology faces given the dramatic demographic changes that are occurring in our population that have implications for the education and training of neuropsychologists.

Keywords

Residency Program Doctoral Program American Psychological Association Stereotype Threat Postdoctoral Fellowship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wilfred G. van Gorp
    • 1
  • Hector F. Myers
    • 2
  • Evan B. Drake
    • 1
  1. 1.New York Presbyterian Hospital Cornell Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.UCLA School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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