Helping Troubled Children and Families

A Paradigm of Public Responsibility
  • Jane Knitzer

Abstract

As America enters the 21st century, there is growing debate about the extent to which the schools, a central socializing institution, are structured to produce the kind of workforce that America needs (National Education Goals Panel, 1995; Toch, 1991). On a much less public level, another debate about structure is also taking place–the structure of the social service system that seeks to improve outcomes for a large and vulnerable group of children at risk of school and life failure. Broadly writ, the helping systems for such children and families typically include at least four core public agencies and institutions that, sequentially or concurrently, but typically without regard for one another, serve the children and families: these are the departments of social service, including child welfare agencies; mental health agencies; juvenile justice agencies; and schools (often special education programs, but sometimes regular education)

Keywords

Assure Univer Metaphor Edna Eisen 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane Knitzer
    • 1
  1. 1.National Center for Children in PovertySchool of Public HealthNew YorkUSA

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