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Conducting Research with Children and Adolescents in Clinical and Applied Settings

Practical Lesson from the Field
  • Dennis Drotar
  • Jane Timmons-Mitchell
  • Laura L. Williams
  • Tonya M. Palermo
  • Rachel Levi
  • Jane R. Robinson
  • Kristin A. Riekert
  • Natalie Walders
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

In order to successfully conduct research in clinical and other applied settings with children and adolescents, investigators need to learn to manage a number of logistic problems that can be difficult to anticipate (Drotar, 1989). These problems include developing collaborations with agency and hospital staff that are necessary to recruit subjects (Drotar, 1993), recruiting and maintaining research participants in studies, and managing problems in data collection, especially those that threaten the integrity of study design. Researchers who work with children and families need to anticipate as many of these problems as possible so that they can either implement strategies to prevent them, which is the preferable approach, or develop data analytic approaches to limit their influence on the quality of their data (see Chapter 4, this volume).

Keywords

Mental Health Child Welfare Child Welfare System Mental Health Setting Mental Health Agency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Drotar
    • 1
  • Jane Timmons-Mitchell
    • 2
  • Laura L. Williams
    • 3
  • Tonya M. Palermo
    • 1
  • Rachel Levi
    • 4
  • Jane R. Robinson
    • 1
  • Kristin A. Riekert
    • 4
  • Natalie Walders
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsRainbow Babies and Children’s HospitalClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity HospitalsClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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