Advertisement

Preparing Grants to Secure Research Funding from Government Agencies

  • Dennis Drotar
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Research funding is critical to the development of research in clinical child and pediatric psychology. The conduct of clinically relevant research in these fields can involve time-consuming and costly tasks involving recruitment and retention of research participants, data collection, and analysis. Moreover, prospective and multisite research projects that are often necessary to advance scientific knowledge in pediatric and clinical child psychology are very expensive and require substantial funding (Drotar, 1994). Research funding is also important to the success of many interdisciplinary research programs, especially large-scale projects (see Chapter 13, this volume).

Keywords

Government Agency Study Section Grant Application Grant Proposal Data Analytic Plan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Agnew, B. (1997). Eureka! NIH Adopts “innovation” as a grant criterion. Journal of NIH Research, 9, 30–31.Google Scholar
  2. American Psychological Association. (1997). NIMH restructure extramural research programs. Psychological Science Agenda, 10, 1–4.Google Scholar
  3. Azar, B. (1998). Peer review overhaul nears completion. APA Monitor, 29(8), 22.Google Scholar
  4. Baron, R. (1987). Research grants: A practical guide. In M. P. Zanna and J. M. Darley (Eds.), The complete academic (pp. 151–159). New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  5. Bonowski, J. G. (1996). Applying for research grants. In F. Leong & T. T. Austin (Eds.), The psychology research handbook. A guide for graduate students and research assistants (pp. 312–351). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  6. Brooks, N. (1989). Writing a grant application. In G. Parry & F. N. Watts (Eds.), Behavioral and mental health research. A handbook of skills and method (pp. 123–136), Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  7. Chesney, M. A. (1997). NIH funding a question of behavior. Facts of Life, 2, 1–4.Google Scholar
  8. Cohen, J. (1992). A power primer. Psychological Bulletin, 112, 155–159.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Cuca, J. M. (1984). NIH grant applications for clinical research: Reasons for poor ratings or disapproval. In Preparing a research grant application to the National Institutes of Health, Selected articles (pp. 453–463). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, Division of Research Grants.Google Scholar
  10. Cuca, J. M., & McLoughlin, W. J. (1984). Why clinical research grant applications fare poorly in review and how to recover. In Preparing a research grant application to the National Institutes of Health. Selected articles (pp. 55–58). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, Division of Research Grants.Google Scholar
  11. Cutlet, J., & Cohen, S. (1995). Influencing the political agenda on behalf of psychological research. In H. A. Pincus (Ed.), Research funding and resource manual: Mental health and addictive disorders (pp. 453–470). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  12. Dawes, R. (1995). How do you formulate a testable exciting hypothesis? In W. Pequegnat & E. Stover (Eds.), How to write a successful research grant application: A guide for social and behavioral scientists (pp. 93–96). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  13. Drotar, D. (1994). Psychological research with pediatric populations: If we specialize, can we generalize? Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 19, 403–414.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Drotar, D. (1995). Consulting with pediatricians: Psychological perspectives. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  15. Grant, A. J., & Bowe, F. G. (1995). Getting the most from federal information sources. In R. M. Eckstein (Ed.) (pp. 140–149), Coral Gables, FL: Research Grant Guides Inc.Google Scholar
  16. Grant, G. E. (1997). Memo to Direction Offices of Sponsored Programs-Office of Policy for Research Administration, NIH.Google Scholar
  17. Herek, R. (1995). Developing a theoretical framework and rationale for a research proposal. In W. Pequegnat & E. Stover (Eds.), How to write a successful research grant application: A guide for social and behavioral scientists (pp. 85–92). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  18. Kraemer, H. C., & Thiemann, S. (1987). How many subjects? Statistical power analysis in research. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  19. Levitan, T. (1998). (personal communication).Google Scholar
  20. Locke, L. F., Spirduso, W. W., & Silverman, S. J. (1987). Proposals that work. A guide for planning dissertations and grant proposals. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  21. Lorion, R. P. (1995). Grantsmanship: A view from inside and out. In W. Pequegnat & E. Stover (Eds.), How to write a successful research grant application: A guide for social and behavioral scientists (pp. 39–46). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  22. Lyman, W. (1995). Reading between the lines of your summary statement. In W. Pequegnat & E. Stover (Eds.), How to write a successful research grant application: A guide for social and behavioral scientists (pp. 73–77). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  23. Matthews, K. A. (1997) What do NIH councils do? The Health Psychologist, 1910.Google Scholar
  24. McGinnis, J. M., & Foege, W. H. (1993). Accidental causes of death in the United States. Journal of American Medical Association, 271, 2207–2212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Mucha, F. (1995). Developing a budget and financial justification. In W. Pequegnat & E. Stover (Eds.), How to write a successful research grant application: A guide for social and behavioral scientists (pp. 161–170). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  26. National Institutes of Health, Division of Research Grants. (1984). Preparing a grant application to the National Institutes of Health. Selected articles. Bethesda, MD: Author.Google Scholar
  27. National Institutes of Health. (1990). Helpful hints on preparing a research grant application to the NIH. Bethesda, MD: Author.Google Scholar
  28. National Institutes of Health. (1998). Guidelines on the inclusion of children as participants in research involving human subjects. Medical Research Funding Bulletin, April 10,17–18.Google Scholar
  29. Ogden, T. E. (1991). Research proposals: A guide to success. New York: Raven Press.Google Scholar
  30. Pincus, H. A. (1995). (Ed.), Research funding and resource manual: Mental health and addictive disorders. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.Google Scholar
  31. Taylor, H. G. (1995). Developing the data analytic plan. In W. Pequegnat & E. Stover (Eds.). How to write a successful research grant application: A guide for social and behavioral scientists (pp. 153–160). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  32. Walders, N., Tanielian, T. L., & Pincus, H. A. (1999). Getting funded for research. In J. Kaye, E. Silberman, and & L. Pessar (Eds.), Handbook of psychiatric education and faculty development (pp. 190–214). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  33. West, M. A. (1997). Grant-writing: A guide approval and funding. Current Surgery, 54,118–123.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Drotar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsRainbow Babies and Children’s HospitalClevelandUSA

Personalised recommendations