Assessment of Psychopathology

  • Thomas M. Achenbach

Abstract

A developmental approach to psychopathology aims to advance our understanding of behavioral and emotional problems in relation to developmental tasks, sequences, and processes. Assessment must therefore take account of both the continuities and the discontinuities that occur across the life span. Assessment must also detect individual differences that occur within developmental periods and those that persist from one period to another.

Keywords

Fatigue Attenuation Weinstein 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas M. Achenbach
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA

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