Seed Legislation and Law Enforcement

  • Miller B. McDonald
  • Lawrence O. Copeland

Abstract

Seed laws provide for the orderly marketing of seed. In doing so, these laws protect the interest of both the buyer and the seller. They protect the buyer by requiring that seed is properly labeled and, in some cases, that the seed meets minimum standards of quality. They protect sellers by setting forth clear regulations and procedures that, if followed, will enable them to avoid controversies and litigation over seed quality and performance. Thus, seed laws are an essential part of any well-developed, mature seed industry which, in turn, is an essential ingredient in any society with a well-developed, effective agriculture.

Keywords

Shipping Marketing Boulder Protec 

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miller B. McDonald
    • 1
  • Lawrence O. Copeland
    • 2
  1. 1.Ohio State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Michigan State UniversityUSA

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