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Seed Certification

  • Miller B. McDonald
  • Lawrence O. Copeland

Abstract

Seed certification is a quality control system whereby seeds and propagating materials of improved crop varieties are maintained at a high level of genetic purity and made available to the public. It is a legally recognized program for increasing small quantities of seed of genetically pure varieties into large supplies adequate to meet the demands for planting. Thus, seed certification programs, along with foundation seedstock programs, provide a vital link between plant breeders who develop public (and some private) crop varieties and farmers or other users who plant them.

Keywords

Certification Program Foundation Seed Title Versus Field Inspection Seed Certification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miller B. McDonald
    • 1
  • Lawrence O. Copeland
    • 2
  1. 1.Ohio State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Michigan State UniversityUSA

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