Microbiology of Finfish and Finfish Processing

  • Brian K. Mayer
  • Donn R. Ward

Abstract

Finfish are generally regarded as being much more perishable than other high-protein muscle foods. This high degree of perishability is due primarily to the large concentration of nonprotein nitrogenous compounds present in fish muscle. These compounds, which include free amino acids and volatile nitrogen bases such as ammonia, trimethylamine, creatine, taurine, the betaines, uric acid, anserine, carnosine, and histamine are utilized actively by bacteria during spoilage (Jay 1986). Another factor that contributes to the perishability of finfish is the temperature of the water from which they are harvested. The bacterial flora of cold-water fish species are not inhibited as effectively by refrigeration as are the normal flora of fish harvested from warm tropical waters. When handled properly, tropical fish species are generally less prone to rapid spoilage and exhibit a longer refrigerated shelf life than cold-water species (Disney 1976; Poulter et al. 1981; Sumner et al. 1984). This broad generalization, however, may have to be reconsidered. A review by Lima dos Santos (1981) on the storage of tropical fish on ice contends that there are too many variables for direct comparisons, and that there are instances of cold-water fish such as halibut and grenadiers having a shelf life, on ice, for up to 3 weeks.

Keywords

Surfactant Bacillus Catalase Histidine Algin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian K. Mayer
  • Donn R. Ward

There are no affiliations available

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