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Stability of Canola Oil

  • Zenia J. Hawrysh
Chapter

Abstract

Canola oil is used to identify oil obtained from low erucic acid, low glucosinolate rapeseed. Canola oil is Canada’s major vegetable oil. In 1988, canola accounted for 83% of the salad/cooking oil, and 42% and 57% of the vegetable oil used for margarine and shortenings, respectively, in Canada (Statistics Canada 1988). A total of 87 million kilograms of Canadian canola oil was exported (Statistics Canada 1988). To ensure continued and expanded product utilization, canola oil quality and stability are of utmost concern to both processors and users.

Keywords

Peroxide Value Propyl Gallate Flavor Score Propyl Gallate Ascorbyl Palmitate 
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  • Zenia J. Hawrysh

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