Radiation Protection and Cancer Therapy by Linoleate

  • K. S. Iwamoto
  • L. R. Bennett
  • A. E. Villalobos
  • C. A. Hutson
  • W. H. McBride
  • A. Norman
Chapter
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 67)

Abstract

Linoleate (LA) injected i.p. into mice one day after the inoculation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells prevented the growth of the tumor (1). It also protected mouse bone marrow cells against radiation damage even when injected an hour or more after exposure of the mice to gamma rays (2). It seems likely, therefore, that combined radiation and LA therapy may be useful for the control of selected cancers. We have begun an investigation of the combined therapy both by clinical studies of the safety and efficacy of LA therapy in 41 dogs and 12 cats with advanced cancer and by laboratory studies.

Keywords

Toxicity Lymphoma Sarcoma Diarrhea Glutamine 

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References

  1. 1.
    Norman A, Bennett LR, Mead JF, Iwamoto KS. Nutr Cancer, 11:107-115, 1988.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Norman A, McBride WH, Bennett LR, et al. Postirradiation Int J Radiat Biol, 54:521-524, 1988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lepage G, Roy CC. J Lipid Res, 29:227-235, 1988.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Van der Merwe CF, et al. Br J Clin Pract, 41: 907–915, 1987.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. S. Iwamoto
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. R. Bennett
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. E. Villalobos
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. A. Hutson
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. H. McBride
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Norman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Radiological Sciences and Radiation Oncology and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Animal Cancer CenterHermosa BeachUSA

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