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Visual Acuity, Aging, and Environmental Interactions: A Neuroscience Perspective

  • J. M. Ordy
  • T. M. Wengenack
  • W. P. Dunlap
Chapter

Abstract

Individual experiences, social, and scientific observations in many disciplines have noted that: 1) vision is of great importance for acquiring detailed information about physical and social environments, and 2) that impairments of visual functions and the incidence of ocular pathologies appear closely associated with advancing age (Birren and Williams, 1982). Although cross-sectional studies may overestimate age declines in various visual functions (Storandt, 1982), they have suggested that impairments in such functions as acuity, contrast sensitivity, adaptation, stereopsis (Pitts, 1982), color vision, glare sensitivity, field of vision, accommodation (Carter, 1982), and ocular motility (Leigh, 1982) may occur with increasing senile ocular changes (Weale, 1982) as part of normal aging. In contrast to the explosive research on visual development, research on vision and aging is still fragmentary and in an exploratory stage (Ordy and Brizzee, 1979; Birren and Williams, 1982).

Keywords

Visual Acuity Retinal Pigment Epithelium Visual Impairment Visual Function Color Vision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Ordy
    • 1
  • T. M. Wengenack
    • 2
  • W. P. Dunlap
    • 3
  1. 1.Fisons PharmaceuticalsRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Univ. of RochesterRochesterUSA
  3. 3.Tulane Univ.New OrleansUSA

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