Photobiology pp 839-845 | Cite as

Zinc(II)-Phthalocyanine as a Second-Generation Photosensitizing Agent in Tumour Phototherapy

  • G. Jori
  • R. Biolo
  • C. Milanesi
  • E. Reddi
  • G. Valduga

Abstract

The use of phthalocyanines as phototherapeutic agents for tumours was first proposed in 1985 (Ben-Hur and Rosenthal, 2985). A variety of cellular and animal studies, (for a review see Spikes, 1986;Tralau et al., 1987) have supported this proposal and it presently appears that some phthalocyanines are probable choices as second-generation tumour-localizers and -photosensitizers. At present, the phthalocyanines most frequently used in the experimental photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumours include some sulfonated derivatives of the tetra-azaisoindole macrocycle (Brasseur et al., 1985;Ben-Hur and Rosenthal, 1986). Although these derivatives are relatively water-soluble, they are still a mixture of compounds with different degrees of sulfonation and/or showing structural isomerism.

Keywords

Zn(II)-phthalocyanine Photodynamic therapy Singlet oxygen Pharmacokinetics Ultrastructural studies 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Jori
    • 1
  • R. Biolo
    • 1
  • C. Milanesi
    • 1
  • E. Reddi
    • 1
  • G. Valduga
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of PadovaPadovaItaly

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