Advertisement

A Dynamic Model for Helium Core Heat Exchangers

  • W. E. Schiesser
  • H. J. Shih
  • D. G. Hartzog
  • D. M. Herron
  • D. Nahmias
  • W. G. Stuber
  • A. C. Hindmarsh

Abstract

To meet the helium (He) requirements of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), the cryogenic plants must be able to respond to time-varying loads. Thus the design and simulation of the cryogenic plants requires dynamic models of their principal components, and in particular, the core heat exchangers. In this paper, we detail the derivation and computer implementation of a model for core heat exchangers consisting of three partial differential equations (PDEs) for each fluid stream (the continuity, energy and momentum balances for the He), and one PDE for each parting sheet (the energy balance for the parting sheet metal); the PDEs have time and axial position along the exchanger as independent variables. The computer code can accommodate any number of fluid streams and parting sheets in an adiabatic group. Features of the code include: rigorous or approximate thermodynamic properties for He, upwind and downwind approximation of the PDE spatial derivatives, and sparse matrix time integration. The outputs from the code include the time-dependent axial profiles of the fluid He mass flux, density, pressure, temperature, internal energy and enthalpy. The code is written in transportable Fortran 77, and can therefore be executed on essentially any computer.

Keywords

Heat Flux Heat Exchanger Mass Flux Heat Transfer Rate Nonlinear Algebraic Equation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M. S. McAshan, “Refrigeration Plants for the SSC,” SSC Central Design Group Report SSC-129, May 1987.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. B. Bird, et al., Transport Phenomena, John Wiley & Sons, New York (1960).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    J. C. Pirkle, Jr. and W. E. Schiesser, “DSS/2: A Transportable Fortran 77 Program for Ordinary and One, Two, and Three-Dimensional Partial Differential Equations,” Proceedings of the 1987 Summer Computer Simulation Conference, Montreal, July 1987.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. C. Hindmarsh, “ODEPACK, A Systematized Collection of ODE Solvers,” in Scientific Computing, R. S. Stepleman et. al. (eds.), North-Holland, Amsterdam (1983).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Helium Thermodynamic System,“ Report by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. to the SSC Central Design Group, March 1988.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    IMSL MATH/LIBRARY—Fortran Subroutines for Mathematical Applications, Version 1.1, User’s Manual, Vol. 2, January 1989.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    D. M. Herron, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., private communication.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    SSC Site-Specific Conceptual Design Report,“ Vol. 1, Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory, Dallas, Texas, p. 447, December 1989.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    C. W. Gear, Numerical Initial Value Problems in Ordinary Differential Equations, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs (1971).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    D. G. Hartzog, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., private communication.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. E. Schiesser
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. J. Shih
    • 2
  • D. G. Hartzog
    • 3
  • D. M. Herron
    • 3
  • D. Nahmias
    • 3
  • W. G. Stuber
    • 3
  • A. C. Hindmarsh
    • 4
  1. 1.Lehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA
  2. 2.Superconducting Super Collider LaboratoryDallasUSA
  3. 3.Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.AllentownUSA
  4. 4.Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryLivermoreUSA

Personalised recommendations