Three-Dimensional Vision

  • J. Russell Noseworthy
  • Arthur M. Ryan
  • Lester A. Gerhardt
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 168)

Abstract

Three-dimensional vision refers to the process of gathering, processing, and interpreting visual data of a three-dimensional environment. A 3-D vision system may employ either passive or active techniques. A passive technique is one that utilizes available light sources (i.e., those necessary to provide general illumination of the viewed environment), whereas an active technique utilizes the projection of a prestructured light pattern to supply “ground truth” information. This chapter describes the calibration of a fixed camera and a fixed laser scanner. Three-dimensional point estimation methods are then discussed. Finally, a working 3-D vision system used for robotic assembly is described.

Keywords

Flare Dinates Cali Summing ReNe 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Russell Noseworthy
    • 1
  • Arthur M. Ryan
    • 1
  • Lester A. Gerhardt
    • 1
  1. 1.Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering Department Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space ExplorationRensselaer Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA

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