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Case Study 1 — ARMS: Acquiring Robotic Assembly Plans

  • Alberto Maria Segre
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 120)

Abstract

The ARMS system is an explanation-based learning-apprentice system operating in a robot assembly domain. ARMS is a learning-apprentice system because it learns, in part, by analyzing an external agent’s solution to a given problem, as opposed to a solution produced by an internal weak-method problem solver.

Keywords

Causal Model Goal Specification Operator Schema Kinematic Chain Learning Criterion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alberto Maria Segre

There are no affiliations available

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