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Biological Diversity in an Ecological Context

  • Peter S. White
  • Jeffrey C. Nekola

Abstract

The most common definitions of biological diversity focus on state variables, such as genes, species, and communities, but processes, such as gene flow, survivorship, competition, and energy flow, ultimately determine the nature of these state variables and are critical to the survival of biological diversity itself (Noss 1990). The relationship between biological diversity, ecological process, and human activities is now a critical concern for scientists and policy makers (Lubchenco et al. 1991).

Keywords

Species Richness Biological Diversity Ecological Function Scale Dependence Temporal Constraint 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter S. White
  • Jeffrey C. Nekola

There are no affiliations available

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